COLOMBO SECURITY CONCLAVE

COLOMBO SECURITY CONCLAVE

|
April 22, 2022 - 10:44 am

 CSC Adopts Road Map For Cooperation In Maritime Security, Counterterrorism


    The Colombo Security Conclave (CSC) virtual conference on ‘Sharing of experiences in the investigation of terrorism cases’ was organized by the National Investigation Agency (NIA) of India. India, Maldives, Mauritius, Sri Lanka & Banglades panellists and participants attend the virtual conference. The member states agreed on a road map for cooperation and collaboration that will “facilitate robust mechanisms for coordinated responses, capacity building and strengthening information flow”, according to a joint statement issued after the meeting.

    Participants discussed the various challenges related to terrorism in their respective countries and shared experience in the prosecution of terrorism cases, strategies to deal with foreign fighters and countering the misuse of the internet and social media. Panellists emphasised the need for closer cooperation and coordination among member and observer countries of the CSC for effective investigation & prosecution of terrorism and radicalisation related cases. Participants also agreed to identify specific areas to take forward the cooperation on countering terrorism and radicalisation under CSC. 

    The national security advisors-level meeting of the Colombo Security Conclave (CSC) was held in the first week of March in the Maldivian capital city, Male. The conference witnessed the admission of Mauritius to the grouping, which includes India, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives as members and Bangladesh and Seychelles as observers. The meeting called for the institutionalization of the CSC, dubbed as the “region’s 911,” by identifying five pillars for future cooperation. The conclave focused on maritime safety and security, terrorism and radicalization, cybersecurity, and humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

    Established in 2011 as a trilateral grouping consisting of India, Sri Lanka and Maldives for collaborating on collective maritime security issues, the CSC is moving towards expansion and greater institutionalisation. This has been evident from the most recent iteration of the grouping where Mauritius was welcomed as the fourth member and key areas of security cooperation were described in the joint statement as the five pillars of CSC—maritime security, counter-terrorism, combating transnational crime, cyber security and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR). As the CSC is further projected to expand with the inclusion of Seychelles and Bangladesh in its future iterations, India’s capacity and commitment to collaborate with these nations across these five pillars will be a crucial determinant for shaping India’s image as the Preferred Security Partner (PSP) in the Indian Ocean Region (IOR).

    India’s geography in the Indian Ocean is the most significant strategic advantage that enables India to project itself as the PSP in the region as opposed to the other contenders. This is a fact that the representatives from the Indian Navy highlighted in the recently convened parliamentary standing committee on defence. Geographical proximity combined with human, military and economic resources put India in a position of strength to assume a leadership role in the key areas of security cooperation laid out in the recent CSC meeting.

    On the other hand, it must be acknowledged that sustaining an effective and robust regional mechanism for economic and security cooperation has been an enduring challenge for South Asia. The bilateral issues between India and Pakistan with the latter’s support to terrorism and insurgency induced instability in Jammu & Kashmir have rendered regional cooperation through the South Asia Association for Region Cooperation (SAARC) a non-starter. Inferring from the SAARC example, India along with the other members must note that success of security cooperation through the CSC will depend on certain prerequisites.

    India’s aspiration for being recognised as the PSP in the IOR is underscored by its commitment to the security of its smaller neighbours in the region. India possesses the military capability necessary for swiftly responding to a crisis in its vicinity and has the track record of unequivocally extending its military, economic and human resources for the security of its neighbours. Minilateral forums such as the CSC are significant in accentuating India’s image as the PSP to its maritime neighbours. As the CSC moves towards developing a concrete roadmap and a defined charter of objectives, it can contribute immensely towards shaping India’s image as the PSP for meeting regional security challenges.

      There is an immense need for cooperation in the IOR given the rising number of security issues and uncertainties. The CSC is more likely to succeed if it maintains a common strategic vision and does not get bogged down on the growing Chinese influence in the region. Countries such as Sri Lanka and Maldives, which are more poised to balance between India and China, will not risk converting the CSC into India’s coalition against China.

Questions and Answers Questions and Answers

Question : Who organized the Colombo Security Conclave virtual conference on Sharing of experiences in the investigation of terrorism cases?
Answers : NIA of India
Question : Who were panellists at the Colombo Security Conclave virtual conference?
Answers : India, Maldives, Mauritius, Sri Lanka & Banglades
Question : What did panellists emphasis on the need for among member and observer countries of the CSC for effective investigation & prosecution of terrorism and radical
Answers : Closer cooperation and coordination
Question : What did participants of CSC agree to?
Answers : Identify specific areas to take forward the cooperation on countering terrorism and radicalisation under CSC
Question : In what capital city was the Colombo Security Conclave held?
Answers : Male
Question : What did the meeting of CSC call for?
Answers : Institutionalization
Question : How many pillars did the CSC identify for future cooperation?
Answers : Five pillars
Question : What were the five pillars of the CSC?
Answers : Maritime safety and security, terrorism and radicalization, cybersecurity, and humanitarian aid and disaster relief
Question : When was the CSC formed?
Answers : 2011
Question : Who was welcomed as the fourth member of the CSC?
Answers : Mauritius
Question : What is the most significant strategic advantage that enables India to project itself as the Preferred Security Partner (PSP) in the region?
Answers : India's geography in the Indian Ocean
Question : What put India in a position of strength to assume a leadership role in the key areas of security cooperation?
Answers : Geographical proximity combined with human, military and economic resources
Feedback